A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

DVD - 2006
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Dickens' novel about the turbulent times of the French Revolution. A timeless tale about two men in love with the same woman.
Publisher: Burbank, Calif. : Warner Home Video, c2006
Branch Call Number: DVD 791.4372 TAL
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (ca. 126 min.) : sd., b&w. ; 4 3/4 in

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m
Monolith
Dec 27, 2012

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us... in short, it was a period very like the present..."

m
Monolith
Dec 27, 2012

Stryver (enters office): "Really -- not working yet, Carton? This is too much! You've got to put your mind on this case!" Sydney Carton (reclining with a hot towel on his face): "No. Not possible." (starts fixing a cocktail) Stryver: "They've got this Charles Darnay up for treason!" Sydney Carton: "I don't know Charles Darnay -- I hate treason, I hate Frenchmen, for that matter -- I hate Englishmen."

m
Monolith
Dec 27, 2012

Jerry Cruncher (to himself): "Bless me if she ain't at it again!" (smacks his kneeling, praying wife on the butt with a shoe) Jerry Cruncher: "Floppin' yourself down and prayin' against my prosperity!" Mrs. Cruncher: "Oh, Jerry, how can I KEEP from prayin', now that I know what your real business is!" Jerry Cruncher: "Listen, aggrawaiter! I won't have me wittles blessed off me table by your prayin'!" Mrs. Cruncher: "Grave-robber!" Jerry Cruncher: "Don't say that word! I'm a 'resurrectionist' -- that's what I am! Doin' a noble service for the medical profession! Besides, makin' a bit of money for meself." Jerry Cruncher Jr. "So that's why your fingers is always rusty, favah!" Jerry Cruncher: "Quiet, you! You're an un-natteral wife, and an un-natteral mother, prayin' against me!"

m
Monolith
Dec 27, 2012

Lucie Manette: "We'll come back directly after the service. You'll wait for us?" Charles Darnay: "Yes, I..." Miss Pross: "Well, come along, Lucie. Not going to church, indeed. Atheist. Bankers, and... Frenchmen! All atheists! May I remind you... that the port on the sideboard is for the party after services and not for haphazard consumption!"

m
Monolith
Dec 27, 2012

(Madame DeFarge has come looking for Lucie and the child. Miss Pross bars her way out) Miss Pross: "Oh no you don't!" Madame Defarge: "Let me pass." Miss Pross: "Never! I know what you want. I know what you're after. And thank heaven I'm put here to stop you - for stop you I will!" Madame Defarge: "In the name of the Republic..." Miss Pross: "In the name of no one, you evil woman. You've killed many innocent people. No doubt you'll kill many more; but my ladybird you shall never touch." Madame Defarge: "No? Do you know who I am?" Miss Pross: "You might - from your appearance - be the wife of Lucifer; yet you shall not get the better of me. I'm an Englishwoman! I'm your match!" Madame Defarge: "Pig, get out of my way or I'll break you in pieces." Miss Pross: "Break away, then. I don't care an English tuppence for myself; but I know that the longer I keep you here... the greater hope there is for my ladybird." (catfight ensues)

m
Monolith
Dec 27, 2012

Sydney Carton: "Yours is a long life to look back on, Mr. Lorry?" Jarvis Lorry Jr.: "I'm 78." Sydney Carton: "Long life... useful one." Jarvis Lorry Jr.: "Eh, a solitary bachelor -- nobody would weep for me." Sydney Carton: "Wouldn't SHE weep for you?" (referring to Lucie) Jarvis Lorry Jr.: "Yes, thank God. I didn't quite mean what I said." Sydney Carton: "It is a thing to thank God for, isn't it. Tell me, if you looked back on that long life and saw that you had gained neither love... gratitude, nor respect of any human being... it would be a bitter reflection, wouldn't it?" Jarvis Lorry Jr.: "Why yes, surely." (Sydney nods, solemnly, and slugs down a final shot of booze)

m
Monolith
Dec 26, 2012

Sydney Carton: "It's a far, far better thing I do than I have ever done. It's a far, far better rest I go to than I have ever known."

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l
Love_Legolas_111
Jun 28, 2016

Such a terrific, emotional, heartfelt, well-made, tender movie. Makes me wonder if the book is even better! The characters were so interesting and varied, each with their own quirks, graces, and faults (except maybe Miss Manette, whose kindness and innocence gloss over any faults she might have). Sydney Carton....he astounded me. Mr. Colman's portrayal of the character grabbed me like an iron chain and didn't let me go. His character of Mr. Carton is so different, so contradictory, so NOT cliche: a smart lawyer with a drinking problem who has failed to find a meaning for himself and his life except in the graces of a young girl who sees in him "possibilities". His growth as a character throughout the film is astonishing, well done, and beautifully portrayed in my opinion by Colman. The other characters play off each other well also, adding more layers of depth to the story. The ending is an expected conclusion, full of sweet emotion and sadness. It almost seems as if evil and mob rule win in the end...but not for those of us who know Carton's story, and how things in history will finally end. Such a terrific film. Stupendous. I enjoyed it very much.

v
voisjoe1_0
Jan 25, 2016

This 1935 Hollywood version of Charles Dickens’ great novel of the French Revolution may seem somewhat simplified to today’s audiences, but remember, Hollywood, until the dismantling of the Hayes Code, had to keep things simple and uncomplicated. The film is rated 4 of 4 stars by Leonard Maltin and 100% fresh by Rotten Tomatoes. For a more complicated version of the French Revolution, see Polish director Andrzej Wajda’s French language 1983 film Danton starring Gerard Depardieu.

u
uugene
Jun 30, 2015

The movies of Ronald Colman's era are imbued with age and corniness -- who'd want to watch that stuff today? And yet Colman himself remains compelling, and this Dickens movie was a quality production.

g
garycornell
Sep 29, 2014

I love a movie where one actor plays two parts. In Charles Dicken's "A Tale of Two Cities" the job falls on the shoulders of Ronald Colman, and he handles it with ease. He plays both an aristocrat and an alcoholic lawyer. Both characters are in love with Elizabeth Allen. One of my favorite characters, Basil Rathbone, also plays a part in the movie. This 1935 movie was directed by Jack Conway and the great cinematography is by Oliver T. Marsh. Like other Dickens adaptations to movies, the original still is the best. Charles Dickens wrote wonderful novels and it is great to see that "A Tale Of Two Cities" was made into a masterpiece that will be cherished for generations to come!

m
Monolith
Dec 26, 2012

A spectacular vintage portrayal of the Dickens piece. The black and white subtracted nothing from the colorful, craggy characters. Quite the opposite. Its age only enhanced its cohesiveness. I especially enjoyed the toothless old hag, the stiff and stuffy Miss Pross, and her catfight with Madame De Farge. Lots of humor, and tenderness as well. Pity, that Rathbone's Marquis St. Evremonde role was so brief, he was terrific. Ronald Colman made up for that, however. He was absolutely superb as Sydney Carton. Tightly directed; impressive production value: thousands of extras storming the Bastille. I can't emphasize enough how much I enjoyed this. FIVE STARS.

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