The Fifth Season

The Fifth Season

Paperback - 2015
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At the end of the world, a woman must hide her secret power and find her kidnapped daughter in this "intricate and extraordinary" Hugo Award winning novel of power, oppression, and revolution. (The New York Times)
This is the way the world ends...for the last time.
A season of endings has begun.

It starts with the great red rift across the heart of the world's sole continent, spewing ash that blots out the sun.

It starts with death, with a murdered son and a missing daughter.

It starts with betrayal, and long dormant wounds rising up to fester.

This is the Stillness, a land long familiar with catastrophe, where the power of the earth is wielded as a weapon. And where there is no mercy.


For more from N. K. Jemisin, check out:

The Inheritance Trilogy
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms
The Broken Kingdoms
The Kingdom of Gods

The Inheritance Trilogy (omnibus edition)
Shades in Shadow: An Inheritance Triptych (e-only short fiction)
The Awakened Kingdom (e-only novella)

Dreamblood Duology
The Killing Moon
The Shadowed Sun

The Broken Earth The Fifth Season The Obelisk Gate
Publisher: New York :, Orbit,, 2015
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780316229296
Branch Call Number: FIC JEM
Characteristics: 498 pages : map ; 21 cm

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c
coreAgogo
Dec 13, 2018

The world building and the complex characters are what drew me into this story. There are three protagonist's stories being told at the same time and each section jumps from one of their perspectives to the next. Jemisin is such a masterful storyteller, though, letting her readers steep in the narrative for long stretches that you're never confused about which story is being told. Set on a different world, or possibly an alternative timeline on Earth, with different rules about climate and geology, and clashing cultures with well-developed mythologies, the story reminded me of George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series; Game of Thrones if it were written by a woman who wants to talk about the environment, race, class and gender- all of which are expertly woven into the text. The Fifth Season is the near perfect first book of The Broken Earth trilogy.

JCLS_Ashland_Kristin Oct 23, 2018

Sooooo good! There's a reason that all the books in this series are award winners. Will be loved by those who like their fantasy with social commentary built in.

c
ChrisMcMil
Sep 28, 2018

Excellent storytelling: rich, complex and novel in both story line and character development. However I was disappointed to find that it is definitely pure Fantasy rather than Science Fiction (which I would have preferred). That will teach me to pay more attention to the reviews!

k
KristineLeger
Sep 26, 2018

I loved this book, and its sequels, for beautiful world-building and vibrant characters. Fantasy is not my regular genre but I felt completely immersed in this series. My favourite fantasy read since Game of Thrones.

j
jessica_renee
Aug 24, 2018

This is the first book in the Broken Earth Trilogy. N. K. Jemisin has won a Hugo Award for best novel THREE YEARS IN A ROW for all three books in this series. I am recommending this book to everyone. If you're reading this you should stop what you're doing and request this book now. And then the next two in the series. And then let me know what you think of it...I'm dying to talk about it.

p
potterbond007
Aug 05, 2018

The story jumps all over the place and the world building was a bit steep for me. The first hundred pages, I did not have a clue what was going on. I felt like the book ended too fast once I started to understand something of what was going on. Every conversation is interspersed with the character's thoughts and nothing is ever an easy affair. Overall, I am going back to Patrick Rothfuss and Brandon Sanderson. I also need to look at the Game of Thrones books. I do not not know if I would be picking the sequel to this anytime soon.

t
Tauriel
Jun 07, 2018

This book is really, REALLY good. First off, using all of those different POVs to layer within themselves is BRILLIANT!!! I loved how the second person and third person perspectives just... ah. Perfect. Like a fine wine. The story itself cannot be fit into science fiction or fantasy, because it is the best of both worlds and melds scifi and magic together in a very seamless fashion.

CHARACTERS: I loved Damaya, Syenite, and Essun. Their characters were all unique and everything about them spoke of who they are and how they grew up, and I am also very, very curious about Schaffa. Anything else from my mouth can be spoilers, so, onto the...

PLOT: ... and again, anything from my mouth could be spoilers, so I will just do my best! This plot is INTENSE. Like, I haven't had my mind blown like that in a while. And it felt soooo good to read something that awesome. Following the stories of Damaya, Syenite, and Essun, as the world may be ending again, for the last time... super exciting, with an amazing amount of action, learning, and PURE GENIUS.

ACCURACY: This is a world where there is no moon and where some people, called orogenes have the power to use the energy created by seismic events (like the shifting of earth plates and such) in order to "ice" things and do quell earthshakes. Because of this accidental habit of icing, orogenes are derogatorily called "roggas" and are often killed if they are not part of the Fulcrum (clever name) because these "roggas" must be trained to quell shakes and act as virtual slaves to society, or be killed. The whole system is very intriguing, and the whole idea is really well thought out.

RECOMMENDATION: If you like scifi, you should read this. If you like fantasy, you should read this. If you like stories of family and pain and love and sorrow, READ THIS. This book (literally) blew my mind, and not very many books have done that. It is an exceptionally well crafted tale, and I can't wait to read the conclusion!

c
CEG89
May 03, 2018

This book was spectacular. I think the most shocking thing about it, at first, was the POV, which was written in second person. The book explored important issues such a racism, mother-daughter relationships, and community and the author successfully embedded them within the world she created. All at once this book was tragic, suspenseful, intricate, spellbinding and horrifying. A must read.

f
fledge
Apr 12, 2018

Inventive and imaginatively told, the story moves along three tracks, all of which are briskly paced and interesting. The writing is pretty good, though the author drops in register quite often, and distractingly, to conversational asides, even when writing in the third person. Imagine that. (See what I mean?) There’s homo- and bi-sex, graphically depicted, which the author calls “not living in fear,” but this is a political statement in tune with 21st century LGTBQ+ activisim, and contributes little if anything to the story.

t
Tater
Mar 20, 2018

I read this because it was on the "PeakPicks" table and I noticed the Hugo Award. The award was aptly bestowed!

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potterbond007
Aug 06, 2018

potterbond007 thinks this title is suitable for 21 years and over

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DragonRhapsody
Jun 09, 2016

DragonRhapsody thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

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