How Not to Die Alone

How Not to Die Alone

Book - 2019
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7
Smart, darkly funny, and life-affirming, How Not to Die Alone is the bighearted debut novel we all need, for fans of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine , it's a story about love, loneliness, and the importance of taking a chance when we feel we have the most to lose.

"Wryly funny and quirkily charming."--Eleanor Brown, author of The Weird Sisters

Sometimes you need to risk everything...to find your something.

Andrew's been feeling stuck.

For years he's worked a thankless public health job, searching for the next of kin of those who die alone. Luckily, he goes home to a loving family every night. At least, that's what his coworkers believe.

Then he meets Peggy.

A misunderstanding has left Andrew trapped in his own white lie and his lonely apartment. When new employee Peggy breezes into the office like a breath of fresh air, she makes Andrew feel truly alive for the first time in decades.

Could there be more to life than this?

But telling Peggy the truth could mean losing everything. For twenty years, Andrew has worked to keep his heart safe, forgetting one important thing: how to live. Maybe it's time for him to start.
Publisher: New York :, G. P. Putnam's Sons,, [2019]
Copyright Date: ©2019
ISBN: 9780525539889
Branch Call Number: FIC ROP
Characteristics: 324 pages ; 24 cm

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rsmunoz
Jul 15, 2019

I like Brit writers. I like them because they write the way ordinary people live, think, and speak. Roper uses a deft hand introducing an under-the-radar, lonely, 40-something Andrew with ISSUES, who's earning a living in some obscure job setting to rights the affairs of people who've died alone. On the surface this may seem unexciting, but don't be fooled. Not only do still waters run deep, and despite his solitary lifestyle, Andrew is complex yet still manages to be absolutely lovable. His story is entertaining as he navigates his barely tolerable work mates while soliciting advice from his online train forum pals, and is eye-opening in an I-get-life sort of way. This debut novel is definitely worth reading. 4 stars.

l
lola_jane
Jul 12, 2019

I went into this expecting a quirky, lighthearted book and while there are plenty of humorous moments, I was surprised to find it poignant, perceptive, and sometimes downright sad. So often we think that there’s always tomorrow – to reach out to someone, to follow your passion – but tomorrow doesn’t come; "How Not to Die Alone" shows us the regret of those lost tomorrows and that it’s never too late to start again.

DCLadults Jun 25, 2019

A New & Noteworthy pick. Andrew has a wife and loving family. But wait, that’s a lie. Can Andrew risk opening up and telling the truth when he has the opportunity for friendship, or perhaps more? A lovely, quirky debut about loneliness and white lies.

c
curd5223
Jun 24, 2019

I wanted to read this book when I saw someone had said "if you like JoJo Moyes' books, you'll love this one." Not true. I've read all of her books and this one was not even close to being as good. This one was a waste of my time and I only got through about 50 pages.

d
DKCPA
Jun 14, 2019

A quirky read addressing loneliness. Ironically, Andrew finds himself in the same predicament as the people he serves, but overcomes his fears by reaching out to his online chat buddies and grieving the loss of his first love. My favorite line in the book "feel for the briefest flicker of time that they mattered to someone."

PimaLib_JenM Jun 07, 2019

Despite the title having "die" in it, I was expecting this to be a complete romcom, but it has a deeper side to it that I liked. It wrapped up a little too tidily for my taste, though. I recommend it because it was interesting to read about the white lie and how it balloons out of control, how the characters create connections with each other, and to see how the lie and the true reason behind it has affected the main character's life, mental health, and sense of being.

d
darladoodles
May 20, 2019

Definitely life-affirming, but also annoying at times. Andrew's job is a constant reminder of the perils that come with life and relationships. He does home inspections after someone dies alone to find a person to receive the death notification and also look for stashes of cash that might be needed to reimburse for burial. Meanwhile Andrew has allowed a white lie to build into an imaginary life and feels trapped. When Peggy comes along, he is spurred into action -- often impulsive and ill-advised. I do wish we could have the burgeoning relationship be free of attachment on Peggy's side. It is such bad form to meet a coworker for meals outside of work! The last 25% of the book was quite good and saved it from falling below three stars.

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